[SOLVED] If f is continuous at (−∞, ∞), what can you say about its graph?

If f is continuous at (−∞, ∞), what can you say about its graph?

It’s not “none of these” because there is no “these”. (I’ve seen that on answers here when Googling)

This is copied word for word in the book. I’m just trying to study for the test, but there this is not in the solutions guide and I would like to understand it.

Answer:

The Best answer for If f is continuous at (−∞, ∞), what can you say about its graph?

That it doesn’t have vertical asymptotes or holes or any jump discontinuities anywhere.

I.e. you could walk along the entire function’s graph without ever needing to go off your path.

If someone is still interested in solving this question, I believe the answer should be the following:

The graph of a continuous functions at (-infinity, infinity) has no gaps, discontinuities, holes or jumps and can be drawn without lifting the pen from the paper (although you’d never be able to finish drawing it).

This is the correct answer for If f is continuous at (−∞, ∞), what can you say about its graph?

I assume what you have in parenthesis is X?

If so, it means it stretches on forever to the left and right.

Leave a Comment